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Researchers eavesdrop on groupers' mating calls

During their spawning aggregation, some groupers produce courtship-related sounds that are species specific.

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Light Monkey is seeking a Production Assembly Technician

Today, is renowned for their lighting systems, hence the Florida-based lighting system manufacturer is seeking a Pr

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Seals don't threaten Baltic fish stocks as much as humans

A study has confirmed that seals feeding on cod, herring and sprat in the Baltic Sea would not adversely affect the fish population, as much as man-made causes like climate change, nutrient load and fisheries would.

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EUROTEK raises over £4,000 for the BCRC

The is a co-ordinating body for voluntary underground rescues in the British I

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KISS Rebreather

Kiss Rebreather

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Shielding turtle eggs from global warming

In the past decades, the relatively high mean temperatures of 31 degree Celsius at St Eustatius have caused the turtle population to become female-biased.

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Blue mussels flush out most of the microplastic fibers they ingest

Human-made microplastics are found in all the oceans. The most abundant type are fibers, which are shed from materials like carpets and fleece clothing, while their small size means that marine animals as small as zooplankton can consume them.

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Climate change may make oysters less nutritious

A study by the University of Plymouth has shown that ocean acidification and higher temperatures may cause oysters to be less nutritious.

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Taking the Seabob for a Spin

The SEABOB is a luxury seatoy designed for “fun in the sun.” Corporate divers or technical divers are not invited to this party—unless they are vacationing, of course.

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Whale songs get revamp every few years

Over 13 consecutive years, researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ) studied the structure and complexity of songs sung by the eastern Australian humpback whale population as they migrated off the coast of southeast Queensland from 2002 t

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Rockfish can detox toxic chemicals but no match for mercury

The yelloweye rockfish, which lives in the coastal waters of Alaska, can live up to 120 years. Over its lifespan, they are known to accumulate toxic chemicals in their tissues.

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Overfishing, if left unchecked, may shrink size of snow crabs

With eighty percent of the snow crabs in Newfoundland and Labrador currently smaller than fishable size, Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has warned that continued fishing pressure may lead to long-term harm to the species.

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Textile microfibers at south European seafloor mainly from washing

Not much is known about the textile microfibers in the seafloor sediments.

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Antarctic krill unfazed by future ocean acidification

New research has found that Antarctic krill would be largely unaffected by the higher levels of ocean acidification predicted for the next 100 to 300 years.

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"Rare jellyfish" not so rare after all

The jellyfish was first discovered in 1827 in the Strait of Gibraltar by French naturalists Jean René Constant Quoy and Joseph Paul Gaimard. At that time, as many as nine specimens were found.

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How Deepwater Horizon oil spill affected stingrays' sensory abilities

Just 48 hours of exposure to the crude oil originating from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 was enough to affect the olfactory senses of Atlantic stingrays, according to new research.

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Warmer oceans increase risk of hookworm infection to fur seal pups

Through a chain of events, more and more fur seal pups risk dying from hookworm infections as a result of rising ocean temperatures.

This is the conclusion in a study recently published in the eLife journal.

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