Tutorials

Prepping for Print

Prepping for Print. Simulation image by Rico Besserdich.
For large prints, the increased viewing distance plays an important role when it comes to DPI resolution and thus maximum possible print size. The larger the print, the less DPI is necessary. Simulation image by Rico Besserdich.

The final stage of creating an image is printing it. Despite the fact that we are living in an increasingly screen-oriented world, a printed image still proves the old saying, “If it’s not printed, it does not exist.” This is 100 percent right. As a matter of fact, only a good print can reveal the full magic and spirit of your image. This is what you, and your images, deserve, and this is what we are going to discuss now.

Proper Export of Underwater Images in Postproduction

Lionfish, the image to be used for this tutorial
Lionfish, the image to be used for this tutorial

In this series of articles on postproduction of underwater images, we have worked a lot on white balance settings, basic and advanced exposure corrections, contrast and curves, advanced techniques of removing colour casts, basic and advanced retouching, final colour boost, cropping and sharpening. Finally, our image is ready! And now, we arrive at the question: What do I do with it?

Branding Videos & Digital Media Marketing

Social media and influencer promotion is becoming a larger part of the digital marketing mix each year.

Branding videos, sponsored posts, social media marketing... confused? We interviewed digital media marketing consultant and underwater photographer Brent Durand to get the scoop on what these services are and how they can benefit your dive business and increase your sales.

Retouching Underwater Images

Image 2. Problem zones can be identified (red circles) by zooming into an area of the tutorial image.

It should not happen but sometimes it does anyway: those annoying little white dots in our underwater images, which detract from the overall impression of the photograph. Known as backscatter, these dots appear when small particles in the water reflect the light from a strobe. The more directly the strobe light hits a subject, the higher the risk of backscatter. That is why a strobe should not be pointed straight at a subject.

Free video tutorial from Brent Durand on unusual macro UW photo techniques

Free video tutorial on unusual macro UW photo techniques

Durand writes: “If you've been shooting for a while, you've likely read a number of articles with basic macro photo tips. These tips are largely the same (in my articles as well). And they're essential tips. But let's go beyond that and discuss macro photo tips you'll rarely see included in the general articles.”