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UK scuba diving sites, Chepstow, NDAC, National Diving and Activity Centre, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, XRay Mag, X-Ray Magazine, scuba diving news
The loss of this exceptional training resource will be deeply felt within the recreational and technical diving community. NDAC is a unique site in that offers diving in the 6 metre to 80 metre range

NDAC: Top UK dive training quarry closes

The National Diving & Activity Centre is based at a large flooded quarry in Tidenham, Gloucestershire, England. This dive site is located on the English / Welsh border at Chepstow, just a few minutes' drive from the M48 Severn Bridge. For 52 years, this was a toll bridge - cars would pay £5.60 to cross the River Severn. When bridge tolls were scrapped on 17 December 2018, NDAC suddenly became financially more attractive to dive. 

NDAC is permanently closed. We are not taking bookings for leisure activities or public diving.

Membership Question

Divers have asked NDAC about membership refunds. Ashley Bryce, NDAC Manager responded stating that all memberships had been extended by seven months to account for the Covid-19 lockdown. 

What's next for NDAC?

At the time of writing this, it is not known what will happen to NDAC. Rumours have been circulating for a number of weeks that the Ministry of Defence has bought this dive site. This is unlikely. There are other rumours that the quarry is going to be developed into a holiday park. Whether recreational and technical divers will be able to access and dive these unique waters again, is not known at this point. 

Maar Lakes of Germany's Volcanic Eifel Region

Maar lake in Volcanic Eifel, Germany. Photo by Claudia Weber-Gebert
Maar lake in Volcanic Eifel, Germany. Photo by Claudia Weber-Gebert

What is the origin of the unique lakes in the Volcanic Eifel region of Germany? In short, they were created from an explosion of water vapour when lava from a hot spot under the region met with groundwater thousands of years ago. The explosion created a round funnel, or crater, with earthen walls, which was later filled with rainwater. That is why the water is really clear and has rather good visibility.

Climate Change & the Growing Crisis of Our Oceans

Partically bleached coral in the Mediterranean Sea, Cape Carbonara, Sardinia. Photo by Lorenzo Moscia
Partially bleached colony of the madreporarian Cladocora caespitosa, one of the most important hard corals in the Mediterranean, at Cape Carbonara, Sardinia

Climate change is increasing the crisis of our seas, already under pressure due to several human activities. Rising temperatures are affecting and changing the underwater environment all over the world. The Mediterranean Sea, unfortunately, is no different from other seas. A group of specialists, coordinated by Greenpeace Italy, are monitoring the situation in the waters around Italy. Lorenzo Moscia reports.

Pemba Island: Diving in Tanzania's Zanzibar Archipelago

Nudibranch, Pemba, Tanzania. Photo by Pierre Constant
Nudibranch, Pemba, Tanzania. Photo by Pierre Constant

Pemba Island is part of the Zanzibar Archipelago in Tanzania. Pierre Constant shares his adventure there, which took him through lush emerald forests, home to the Zanzibar leopard and rare endemic species of monkeys, a reserve with Seychelles tortoise, as well as diverse dive sites with a delightful variety of corals and marine species, and ample opportunities for underwater photography.