X-Ray Mag #65

Feature-artikler i dette nummer med pdf-filer, der kan downloades

Edited by Gunild Symes   Amy Genser
We Are Water 2, by Amy Genser. Paper and acrylic on masonite, 25 x 49 x 3 inches

American artist Amy Genser works wonders with paper, transforming it into vibrant liquid images and cellular studies reminescent of forms found in coral reef colonies and aquatic environments. A Connecticut native, Genser grew up by the sea, which greatly inspired and influenced her works of art. We caught up with the artist to gain an insight into her mesmerizing, textural pieces.

Christopher Bartlett  

Many people are scared witless by sharks, but I love them. I scuba dive and freedive with them whenever I can.

Christopher Bartlett  

Many people are scared witless by sharks, but I love them. I scuba dive and freedive with them whenever I can.

Christopher Bartlett   Christopher Bartlett

A fifty-minute flight southeast from the bustle, cruise ships and tourist-centric Nassau, lies the sleepy island of San Salvador. Twelve miles long and five miles wide, she is the tip of an underwater mountain rising from 5,000 metres below (15,000 feet) surrounded by picture-postcard, crystal-clear, blue seas.

Pierre-Eric Deseigne   Pierre-Eric Deseigne

In October 2011, Pierre-Eric Deseigne traveled to South Central China and dived the underwater caves of Da’un county for the first time. On his return to the cave system there three years later, Deseigne reflected upon the impact of the historic discovery of these underwater caves.

Pierre-Eric Deseigne   Pierre-Eric Deseigne

In October 2011, Pierre-Eric Deseigne traveled to South Central China and dived the underwater caves of Da’un county for the first time. On his return to the cave system there three years later, Deseigne reflected upon the impact of the historic discovery of these underwater caves.

Peter Symes   Peter Symes

I felt apprehensive heading out to Tiger Beach where I was supposed to enter open water in the presence of some big, wild apex predators, without any protection other than holding up my camera as a shield in case I was singled out as a snack. Before the week was up, I could not get back in the water fast enough, moving around with growing confidence amongst several of these huge but most graceful sharks and having encounters and interactions that left a deep and indelible impression, which will stay with me for the rest of my days.

Peter Symes   Peter Symes

I felt apprehensive heading out to Tiger Beach where I was supposed to enter open water in the presence of some big, wild apex predators, without any protection other than holding up my camera as a shield in case I was singled out as a snack. Before the week was up, I could not get back in the water fast enough, moving around with growing confidence amongst several of these huge but most graceful sharks and having encounters and interactions that left a deep and indelible impression, which will stay with me for the rest of my days.

How you can improve your performance and safety by understanding why we make good (and bad) decisions.

Pete Bucknell   Dr Michael Rothschild

The GoPro has changed the underwater video game forever. This handy camera seems easy to use but a quick browse of YouTube underwater videos tells the real story: Ninety percent of such GoPro videos are wobbly, blue, poorly-framed and badly-lit video footage. Fortunately, with a few simple steps, a diver can greatly improve the quality of their GoPro images.

Vic Verlinden   Vic Verlinden

During the two world wars, many private vessels were confiscated by the British Royal Navy. These luxury yachts were often employed during dangerous missions, which did not always end well.

Peter Symes and Michael Menduno   Peter Symes , Poseidon
Photo by Peter Symes

The CEO of Poseidon discusses his move from the automotive industry to diving, big data, the role of automation, safety and the future of rebreather diving.

Vladimir Gudzev   Vladimir Gudzev

In Medieval times, when Lake Issyk-Kul in Kyrgyzstan was a stop-over on the Silk Route, which connected Europe and Asia, the lake level was some 8m lower than it is today. In areas along what used to be the coastline but have since become submerged, divers have discovered the remains of a 2,500-year-old advanced civilization. Vladimir Gudzev and his buddies went to the area to have a look.

Larry Cohen and Olga Torrey   Larry Cohen and Olga Torrey

The main reason for diving Malpelo Island is the sharks. The area is known for large schools of hammerheads, silky sharks, Galapagos and whitetip sharks. In the winter there is a population of sand tigers, and in late summer and fall, whale sharks call these waters their home. Other large pelagics can also be viewed. Tuna, jacks and eagle rays are not uncommon, with the occasional manta ray making an appearance.

Konstantinos Alexiou   Konstantinos Alexiou

It is estimated that approximately seven million divers are active worldwide and 500,000 new divers are training annually [1]. Moreover, professional divers actively carry out diving operations for the purposes of commercial, scientific or military diving. The underwater environment is unique and any exposure to it presents a number of stresses to the human system.

Michael Salvarezza and Christopher P. Weaver   Michael Salvarezza and Christopher P. Weaver

The waters of the Eyjafjordur Fjord were still and calm. There was a sharp crispness to the air and snow covered the hills lining the shore. Except for the gentle lapping of water against the sides of our inflatable dive boat, the world around us was silent. To the north we could see heavy gray clouds hanging low to the horizon, the first signs of an approaching storm undoubtedly born in the Arctic wilderness just a few miles away. In a few short hours, the weather would turn bad and diving would become impossible. For now, all was calm and we were focused on preparations for an underwater adventure to an alien world.

Simon Pridmore   Peter Symes

Confronted by a genie in a lamp and three wishes, many new divers would ask for a magic spell to make their air last longer on a dive. The good news is that you don’t actually need a genie in a lamp—the key to better air consumption is not a secret at all.

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