Greece

Hilarion: Exploring the Greek Silver Mines of Lavreotiki

Smiling faces after completion of a successful dive in Mine 80 (below) with Tzamalis (right) at the surface in support of exploration divers Kranidiotis (left) and Stamatakis (center), Hilarion mine complex, Lavrio, Lavreotiki, Greece. Photo by Maria Fotiadi.

In May 2019, a group of dry cavers visited the famous silver mines of Lavrion in the southeastern area of Attica, Greece. The main objective of the visit was to inspect and document the flooded chambers.

The number of amphorae lying on the cargo surficial layer was 1,200, based on the detailed counting of the intact amphorae

Massive Roman shipwreck discovered in Mediterranean

Greek archaeologists have discovered the remains of a massive Roman vessel believed to be the largest classical shipwreck found in the eastern Mediterranean. Believed to have sunk some 2,000 years ago, the 35-metre vessel was discovered at a depth of around 60m during a survey off Kefalonia, one of the Ionian islands off Greece’s west coast. The site is situated 1.5 miles from the entrance to the harbour of Fiscardo, the island's only village to not be destroyed during World War II.

Rebuilding Greece's Dive Industry: An Interview with Avgerinos Vrazopoulos

Avgerinos Vrazopoulos at Boot expo exhibiting with ScubaHellas.com - the portal covering Greece's dive operators and locations

Greek diving is back on the menu. X-RAY MAG’s Peter Symes asks Avgerinos Vrazopoulos, the director of Scuba Hellas—the Greek diving marketing group—for insights into the development of new dive locations and trip packages for international divers.

Until 2003 one of the questions concerning the sinking of the Britannic "was she torpedoed or did she hit a mine"? The 2003 Spencer Expedition found and mapped the German minefield. Exped leader Carl Spencer later co-founded EUROTEK with fellow expedition members Leigh Bishop and Rosemary E Lunn

Britannic100: "Ship Of Dreams Sunk"

HMHS Britannic was the largest ship to sink during World War I. (Weighting in at almost 50,000-tons she was also the largest ship in the world).

Many argue she is one of the most beautiful, intact, well-preserved passenger liners accessible to divers. It is little wonder that these factors, and the story behind her construction and sinking continue to capture divers imagination.

My Two Big Fat Greek Diving Days

Ancient amphoras lay on the sea bed outside Rafti Bay, Greece. Photo by Peter Symes.

As my plane touched down in Athens on a warm and sunny October afternoon, it did not seem that long ago since the country experienced deep economic woes, during which a prolonged spat between the Greek Prime Minister Tsipras and then Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis and the German Chancellor Angela Merkel over the EU bailout dominated the news for weeks on end, painting at times a bleak picture of a nation on the very brink of collapse and si

Filephoto: Roman mosaic: Odysseus and the Sirens

Scores of ancient shipwrecks found in Greek archipelago

RPM Nautical fundation, an American maritime research non-profit, announced this week that they have just uncovered a whopping 22 shipwrecks around the Fourni archipelago—a find they say adds 12 percent to the total number of known ancient shipwrecks in Greece. Over half of the wrecks date to the Late Roman Period (circa 300-600 A.D.). Overall, the shipwrecks span from the Archaic Period (700-480 B.C.) to the Classical (480-323 B.C.) and Hellenistic (323-31 B.C.) through the Late Medieval Period (16th century).

U-Boat Navigator Mission: HMHS Britannic

Triton submarine over Britannic. Photo by Eugene Tomashov.

Through the centuries in Greece, Kea Island’s renowned statue, the Lion of Kea (one cannot see him from the shore, but I know he is there), continues to smile and look askance upon human vanity—exactly the same way he did in 1916, when during World War I, hospital ships were hit by mines and tragically sank in the Kea Channel. These ships, now wrecks, include HMHS Britannic and SS Burdigala.