Egypt

An adult green turtle from the Karpaz nesting beach
An adult green turtle from the Karpaz nesting beach

Egyptian lagoon is preferred foraging ground for Cyprus' green turtles

Researchers have discovered that Lake Bardawil in Egypt is the preferred foraging spot for female turtles that lay eggs at key rookeries in Cyprus.

Situated at the northern coast of the Sinai Peninsula, Lake Bardawil is a large, shallow lagoon with an artificial opening that connects to the sea. Initially created as a fishery in the 1950s, it became an ideal seagrass habitat for adult green turtles.

Sphinx and Giza pyramids
Sphinx and Giza pyramids

Egypt relaxes photography restrictions for tourists

Egyptian nationals and foreign tourists alike have complained that authorities have requested permits for shooting in public areas, and at times seized cameras and forbidden shooting even if a permit is in place.

In a statement, Minister of Tourism and Antiquities Khaled El-Enani announced that 'photography enthusiasts', foreign residents in Egypt and tourists will be able to take pictures in public without permits and that “no one will be allowed to ask you why you are filming in public”

Hurghada (Egypt): hotels in the southern part of the town
Aireal view of southern part of Hurghada with hotels

Egypt closes part of Red Sea coast after fatal shark attack

The Associated Press reported that the governor of the Red Sea province closed the area for three days.  All "sea activities" have been banned, including diving, snorkelling, wind surfing, kite sailing and fishing boats.

According to reports, an 68-year-old woman from Austria was swimming in the Red Sea near the resort of Sahl Hasheesh when she was attacked by a shark.

Southern Egyptian Red Sea: Safari to the Deep South & Remote Islands

Soft corals, Rocky Island, Red Sea, Egypt. Photo by Scott Bennett
Soft corals, Rocky Island, Red Sea, Egypt. Photo by Scott Bennett

“WHAT TOOK ME SO LONG?” I repeatedly asked myself during a recent trip to the Red Sea. One of the globe’s most iconic dive destinations, its spectacular coral gardens, prolific fish life and legendary visibility is beloved by divers the world over. Yet, despite nearly 30 years of diving experience, I somehow had not gotten around to it—definitely on my radar, but inexplicably regulated to the “someday” file.

Are dangerous and meaningless records being spurred on by recognition by Guinness Book of Records?

Depth record called into question

In September 2014, Egyptian national and technical diver Ahmed Gabr performed a deep dive off Dahab in the Egyptian Red Sea under the auspices and observation of adjudicators from The Guinness Book of Records. After the dive, Gabr was acknowledged for having reached the record depth of 332m, surpassing South African Nuno Gomes who made it to 318m in 2005, also off Dahab.

Elphinstone: Grand Canyon of Southern Egypt

It was 6:30 in the morning, and my dive buddy and I were hauling our gear back from the big zodiac speedboat after a thrilling midnight dive on the famous Elphinstone reef in the Red Sea near Marsa Alam, Egypt. While rinsing my gear, Ahmed—the local dive guide—started talking to me because I was diving a back plate, wing and long hose just like him, and he probably felt some kind of connection.