Crustaceans

The two hermit crab species (Coenobita rugosus on the top left and C. perlatus on the top right), with the four shell types used in the research

Why two hermit crab species on same beach don't fight over shells

Researchers from the University of Bayreuth, Germany discovered how two hermit crab species co-exist on the same beach without fighting over limited resources like food or shelter.

Invasion of the King Crabs

In many science fiction movies today—those with alien spaceships—the aliens look very similar to some of the underwater inhabitants of our own planet. Indeed, there is no need to invent some mythical creature to stir up the imagination of the viewer; it is enough just to show an image of a jellyfish, an octopus or a giant crab. And this story is all about the king crabs.

The fossil shrimp from Oklahoma and a recent shrimp
The fossil shrimp from Oklahoma and a recent shrimp

360 million-year-old shrimp

“The oldest known shrimp prior to this discovery came from Madagascar,” Feldmann said. “This one is way younger, having an age of ‘only’ 245 million years, making the shrimp from Oklahoma 125 million years older.”

The discovery is also one of the two oldest decapods (‘ten footed’) to which shrimp, crabs and lobsters belong. The other decapod, Palaeopalaemon newberryi, is of similar age and was found in Ohio and Iowa. “The shrimp from Oklahoma might, thus, be the oldest decapod on earth,” Feldmann explained.