Environment

Motorboat in the Caribbean
Motorboat in the Caribbean (Flickr/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Coral reef fish breed better with less motorboat noise

They then followed the breeding of spiny chromis and discovered that 65 percent of nests on quieter reefs still had offspring at the season’s end, compared to 40 percent on reefs with a lot of motorboat traffic. On quieter reefs, offspring were larger, and each nest had more offspring by the end of the season.

Some juvenile fish on coral reefs exposed to motorboat noise have stunted growth and may be half as likely to survive as fish on quieter reefs, owing to the noise pollution altering their parents' caregiving behavior, said the researchers.

Climate Change & the Growing Crisis of Our Oceans

Partically bleached coral in the Mediterranean Sea, Cape Carbonara, Sardinia. Photo by Lorenzo Moscia
Partially bleached colony of the madreporarian Cladocora caespitosa, one of the most important hard corals in the Mediterranean, at Cape Carbonara, Sardinia

Climate change is increasing the crisis of our seas, already under pressure due to several human activities. Rising temperatures are affecting and changing the underwater environment all over the world. The Mediterranean Sea, unfortunately, is no different from other seas. A group of specialists, coordinated by Greenpeace Italy, are monitoring the situation in the waters around Italy. Lorenzo Moscia reports.

Bracenet, ghost diving, ghost fishing, Pascal van Erp, Healthy Seas, Benjamin Wenke,  Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, X-Ray Mag, XRay Magazine
640,000 tons of fishing nets are annually lost or dumped at sea. Bracenet repurposes some of this lost net in their bracelets

Bracenet donates €50K to Healthy Seas

The German-based enterprise makes ethical bracelets from recycled marine materials, ie diver-recovered ghost fishing nets. Every bracelet purchased raises funds to remove more of this plastic trash / rubbish from our oceans and coastlines. 

We donate a fixed amount up to €5 to 'Healthy Seas' for every product sold. Benjamin Wenke

Howard Johnson, Anilao Scuba Dive Centre, Shala Caliao, scuba diving news, PPE, COVID-19, face masks, plastic pollution, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, X-Ray Mag, XRay Magazine, Philippines
Polymeric materials used in face masks can be a potential source of plastic and break down into microplastic pollution.

Abandoned face masks found on Philippine reef

The popular dive spot is southeast of the Philippine capital, Manila.

BBC Philippine correspondent Howard Johnson joined dive professionals from Anilao Scuba Dive Centre as they resumed diving, following the national lockdown. The dive centre is affiliated to the United Nations Environment Programme’s Green Fins, which promotes sustainable marine tourism in South-East Asia.

The 'Ghost Fishing' organisation puts divers centre stage

It was delivered by a very tall, quiet Dutchman by the name of Pascal van Erp. Pascal explained how he had started to recover abandoned ghost fishing gear entangled on wrecks in 2009. He soon inspired others to join him. It was not long before organised teams of volunteer technical divers were recovering tons of ghost fishing gear off the Dutch coastline. In 2012, Van Erp formally founded the not-for-profit Ghost Fishing organisation.