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Latest

'Death nets' sweeping Australia's oceans clean of life

In the South West marine region for example, gill nets up to eight kilometres wide are having a devastating impact on shark and ray species.

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Tech Wreck Park in Sweden

The wreck was protected by the law 1999 because of its historical value, and as such prohibited to dive on. After reading about other efforts to create a historical wreck park for divers in Sweden, the group became interested in doing the same. The process of applying for the wreck park includes carefully documenting the condition of the wreck. They worked for one and a half years to get the permit to do the dives as research for the park, and got it.

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X-Ray Mag #43

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Tiger sharks hunt like yo-yos

A joint research effort between the University of Hawaii at Mānoa's Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology(HIMB), University of Tokyo, the Japanese National Institute of Polar Research and the University of Florida has shed new light on the hunting b

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CO2 seeps in PNG give insights to the future of coral reefs

Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) scientist Dr Katharina Fabricius has led two research expeditions, with researchers from six countries including Papua New Guinea (PNG), to study three natural CO2 seeps in Milne Bay Province, PNG. This unique location is the only presently known cool, CO2 seep site in tropical waters containing coral reef ecosystems. The study has given scientists unprecedented insights into what coral reefs would look like if greenhouse gas emissions and resulting ocean acidification continues to increase at present rates.

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Dolphins use a double sonar

“The findings add fuel to an already fierce debate in the research community on how the echolocation sound is produced”, says Josefin Starkhammar.

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The beam projections have different frequencies and can be sent in different directions. The advantage is probably that the dolphin can locate the object more precisely.

—Josefin Starkhammar

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New research reveals shark super highways

The world’s sharks are disappearing. These fearsome yet charismatic fish continue to fall victim to overfishing and many are now at risk of extinction as a result.

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X-Ray Mag #42

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'Dead Zones' off US west coast may be irreversible

Dead zones form where microscopic plants, known as phytoplankton, are fertilized by excess nutrients, such as fertilizers and sewage, that are generated by human activities and dumped into the ocean by rivers, or more rarely, where they are fertil

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Weed-eating fish "key to reef survival"

For some years, researchers have pinned their hopes on the ability of weed-eating fish to keep the weeds at bay while the corals recover following a major setback like bleaching, a dump of sediment from the land, or a violent cyclone.

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19th Century Shipwreck found off Borneo

Part-time marine archaeologists Hans and Roz Berekoven - who are married to each other - said their find was unlikely to yield any treasures as the ship had been a British cargo vessel, but it could add to knowledge of trade then, the Jakarta Glob

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Agulhas Current effect on European climate

The Gulf Stream which transports enormous amounts of warm tropical waters to the North Atlantic is the cause of Europe's habitable climate.

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Sea turtles’ magnetic sense

This behavior seems to imply a map sense from which the creatures read either absolute or relative location from at least two coordinates.

Direction is one thing but how about position?

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The results demonstrate for the first time that longitude can be encoded into the magnetic positioning system of a migratory animal.

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X-Ray Mag #41

Don Silcock takes us to the mystical haven of Halmahera in the Maluku Islands.

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Why levels of mercury in fish vary

"It has to do with where they are feeding in the water column and what they're eating," said Anela Choy, University of Hawaii-Manoa

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Cephalopods traumatized by ocean noise

Noise pollution in the oceans has been shown to cause physical and behavioral changes in marine life, especially in dolphins and whales, which rely on sound for daily activities.

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