Steve Jones

Terry Gosliner

December 31, 2014 - 18:54
The story is found: 
on page 42

It’s fair to say that Dr Terrence Gosliner has developed a healthy obsession with Anilao over the years. He is the Senior Curator of Invertebrate Zoology at the California Academy of Sciences, overseeing the scientific research programs and guiding the Academy’s efforts to discover new knowledge and help promote the preservation of life’s diversity.

SJ: You’ve been visiting the waters near Anilao for many years but what led to you first coming to this area?

Anilao: Best of Both Worlds

December 31, 2014 - 17:56
The story is found: 
on page 32

The Philippine destination of Anilao has been described as the “center of the center of marine biodiversity” yet until now has largely remained unknown to European and American divers. This charming location has even more to offer than staggering critter life.

The water beneath me literally boils in a plethora of purple as anthias dance in the mild current. Beneath them the reef known simply as Beatrice is encrusted so densely in brightly coloured crinoids that hardly a single centimeter remains unoccupied.

Indonesia's Gorontalo

May 02, 2014 - 15:33
0 comments
The story is found: 
on page 23

Barely beaten tracks are an increasingly rare find for travellers in this ever more accessible world. Yet on the shores of Tomini Bay on the Indonesian Island of Sulawesi, one such place still exists.

Gorontalo Province lies on a peninsula extending from the northeast of the flower-shaped island of Sulawesi, reaching out towards the Philippines.

Ecologist Mark Erdmann on Raja Ampat

August 13, 2013 - 14:22
0 comments
The story is found: 
on page 35

Dr Mark Erdmann is a coral reef ecologist and senior advisor for Conservation International-Indonesia’s marine program, with a primary focus on managing CI’s marine conservation initiatives in the Bird’s Head Seascape in West Papua.

Having lived there for over 20 years, he has dedicated the majority of his time to the conservation of Raja Ampat and the broader Bird’s Head Seascape since 2004.

Raja Ampat: The Four Kings

July 29, 2013 - 18:54
0 comments
The story is found: 
on page 26

Swirling unicorn fish surround me and seem to have accepted me as one of their own. I can no longer see the surface nor anything else, save for a wall of fish. Only four minutes into the dive and it’s already evident that this site is living up to its reputation, literally boiling with fish. Moments like this remind me why I dive.

At last, I reach the end of the reef, alone, and stare into the blue while I calm my breathing down. As the minutes pass, doubt creeps into my mind as to whether I’ve made the right decision. Everyone is enjoying the busy reef behind me and I am missing it all!

Unity in Diversity

September 22, 2012 - 13:21
0 comments
The story is found: 
on page 20

I’ve been on the road for 36 hours now, and I’m pretty much on the other side of the world from where I started back in rain drenched England. At last, I’m approaching the final legs of the journey—just a short one-hour flight to go.

Things have gone smoothly so far, I’m thinking, as I wander up to the check-in desk for the last leg of my trip. “The flights full,” the attendant tells me, “You’ll have to wait until tomorrow.

Following a mixture of smooth talking and plain old pleading, I managed to “unoffload” myself, and I’m soon in the air heading for New Britain Island, Papua New Guinea. I should be out for the count, but I’m too excited to sleep.

Solomon Islands

October 13, 2011 - 23:36
0 comments
The story is found: 
on page 22

I’m nervous. That’s not an unusual feeling for me when embarking on a challenging dive, yet I am in only two metres of water, the sea is flat calm, and there is no current to impede my progress at all. Indeed, the source of my apprehension lies just beyond the tunnel that I’m cautiously making my way through. I will soon emerge into a shallow pool known as Mirror Pond, and it is here that saltwater crocodiles are frequently sighted.

They are the largest crocodilians on earth, and some say ‘the animal most likely to eat a human’. They are opportunistic hunters and will eat anything they can get their jaws on, even sharks.

The Sound of Mull and Oban Western Scotland

October 13, 2011 - 23:25
0 comments
The story is found: 
on page 37

There is a point in the journey to the west coast of Scotland just a little way north of the City of Glasgow that the landscape changes from “merely” pretty to the full on highland spectacular. It seems as if you are driving into the wilderness.

Oban has become an attraction for a whole range of adventure tourists. Hikers, climbers, wildlife enthusiasts all flock here in droves year round.

Three Caribbean Islands

October 13, 2011 - 23:21
0 comments
The story is found: 
on page 27

It’s not by chance that the producers of the Pirates of the Caribbean series of Hollywood movies chose St Vincent and Dominica as locations. They both offer the rustic charm and unspoiled richness of environment that can, with little effort, take you back hundreds of years.

St Lucia is a maturing package tourist destination, with well established dive schools offering multi-lingual instruction and guidance for both beginner and experienced divers; Dominica is a nature tourist’s idyllic location offering more adventurous dives and above water scenery that is equally as spectacular as that below water; St Vincent, on the other hand, has become known as the “muck diving critter capital of the Caribbean”—a photographer’s dream offering a diversity of species that rivals Lembeh Straights in Indonesia, but with one difference: these are Caribbean species, and many cann