X-Ray Mag #4

Feature articles in this issue with stand-alone pdfs

Michael Symes  

The environments in which the many fish species have evolved are very diverse, ranging from the shoreline to the deep-sea depths, from fresh-water streams to tropical lakes.

Edwin Marcow   Amos Nachoum

Amos Nachoum, world acclaimed wildlife photographer is the recipient of numerous photographic awards and acknowledgements for his ground breaking work in free diving with Great White Sharks and Orcas in the open ocean, speaks to underwater photographer, Edwin Marcow, about his life, work and vision.

There is more and more talk of rebreathers, stated as being the future of diving. However, not many people have tried them. So what is all the fuss about?

Michael Arvedlund  

Coral reef fish ecology is a new research area, probably just about 40 years old, compared, for example, to research in temperate fish ecology, which has been studied extensively for more than 100 years. Therefore, coral reef fish ecologists often have to “borrow” knowledge from what we know about temperate fishes, simply in order to establish the first research in coral reef fish ecology.

Gunild Symes   Jack Connick, Jon Gross, , Washington State Tourism

Puget Sound • San Juan Islands • Strait of Juan de Fuca • Vancouver Island • Alaska.

The waters of the northern Pacific coast of North America are some of the richest in the world in terms of marine life and natural resources due to a continual influx of nutrients brought by currents that circulate in the region. Divers will find both awe-inspiring and challenging experiences to enjoy here.

Gunild Symes   Jack Connick

What wonderfully brilliant red colors one can find in the underwater realm, especially in the Pacific Northwest regions of North America. Why are these marine species so red? How do they get that color? What purpose does it serve? As in many cases in nature, it comes down to simple survival.

In the world of technical diving, a direct ascent to the surface is not an option if you run into a problem or emergency. For this reason, technical divers are required to carry back-up systems to resolve problems associated with equipment malfunction during a dive.

But what about the rest of us?

Bill Becher   Bill Becher

The attorney strokes the white belly of an eight-foot-long reef shark. This is not a lawyer joke. I’m 70 feet (23 m) deep in the clear blue Caribbean water off Roatan Island with a half dozen scuba divers from Anthony’s Key Resort. We’re at a dive site called “Cara a cara,” which in Spanish means “face-to-face.”

Bill Becher   Bill Becher

The attorney strokes the white belly of an eight-foot-long reef shark. This is not a lawyer joke. I’m 70 feet (23 m) deep in the clear blue Caribbean water off Roatan Island with a half dozen scuba divers from Anthony’s Key Resort. We’re at a dive site called “Cara a cara,” which in Spanish means “face-to-face.”

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