January 2009

Drawing and sonar scans of Graf Zeppelin

Want to dive a WW2 German aircraft carrier?

A research ship belonging to Polish oil company Petrobaltic found the 250-metre wreck 55 km north of the Polish port Wladyslawowo at a depth of more than 80m. A Polish Navy ship, sent to the site, identified the wrecked ship as the Graf Zeppelin, which was captured by the Soviet navy, used for target practice and sunk as part of a training exercise in 1947. The Graf Zeppelin was Germany’s only aircraft carrier in the war. Its final resting place had been a mystery.

Leatherback sea turtle hatchlings heading for the ocean.
Leatherback sea turtle hatchlings heading for the ocean.

Australia adds leatherback turtle to national endangered species list

"With warmer temperatures and changing climatic conditions increasing the pressure on water availability, ecological communities such as this must be protected," Mr Garrett said. He had also uplisted the world's largest sea turtle, the leatherback turtle, from vulnerable to endangered.

Leatherback adults average around 1.6 metres in length and weigh from around 250 to 700 kilograms, and are found in tropical and temperate waters around Australia off the south Queensland and New South Wales coasts and off Western Australia's coast, south of Geraldton.

Typical sponge biodiversity of a shallow Caribbean coral reef

Sponges regenerate the reefs

Dutch researcher Jasper de Goeij investigated how caves in the coral reef in Curacao and Indonesia ensure the reef’s continued existence.

Caves in coral reefs are the largest and least well known part of the reef. Until now it had been assumed that sponges populating these caves could only eat by filtering the non-dissolved particles from the seawater. However Mr.de Goeij's as research demonstrated, the caves contain far more dissolved material than non-dissolved material.

Green turtle resting on reef.
Green turtle resting on reef.

Ana the Green Turtle swims from Indonesia to Australia

“Ana’s journey has revealed an ‘oceanic superhighway’ that helps us better understand how marine turtles navigate around the world’s oceans as well as highlighting the strong ecological and evolutionary connections between Indonesia and Australia’s Kimberley-Pilbara coast,” said Gilly Llewellyn, WWF Ocean’s Program Leader.

Ana the Green Turtle swims from Indonesia to Australia

Her journey across the Indian Ocean from a nesting beach in East Java to Kimberley in Western Australia demonstrates the strong biological ties between Indonesia and the reefs on the west Australian coast.

“Ana’s journey has revealed an ‘oceanic superhighway’ that helps us better understand how marine turtles navigate around the world’s oceans as well as highlighting the strong ecological and evolutionary connections between Indonesia and Australia’s Kimberley-Pilbara coast,” said Gilly Llewellyn, WWF Ocean’s Program Leader.